thetomska:

tiorickyaoi:

I’m sick of people wrongly defining bisexuality. It’s not ‘attraction to both men and women’ it’s about being attracted to ‘bi’ things like bicycles, binoculars, bilinguals and binary coding smh

So glad someone finally cleared this up.

2spookysuperwanktural:

kidswithhats:

tsar-bucks:

OKAY MOTHER FUCKERS CAN WE TALK ABOUT THIS PLEASE OKAY GOOD. Y’ALL DOUCHE CANOES BETTER STEP THE  FUCK OFF OF GIRLS. MAYBE A GIRL WANTS A CUTE LITTLE FEATHER OF A FLOCK OF BIRDS OR AN ANCHOR ON HER BODY. MAYBE SHE DOESN’T. MAYBE HER GENDER DOESN’T DEFINE OR CONTROL ANY OF THAT. WHO ARE YOU TO MOTHER FUCKING JUDGE HER FOR WHATEVER SHE GETS. IT’S HER FUCKING BODY. ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE A TATTOO ARTIST LIKE HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT TATTOOS AND THE BODILY AUTONOMY AND SELF EXPRESSION WHICH GOES WITH THEM BUT THEN MAKE EXCEPTIONS FOR WOMEN. FUCK. THAT. FUCK. YOU.
IF YOU’RE GONNA CRITICIZE ANY OF THESE TATTOO CHOICES, CRITICIZE THE DREAM CATCHER FOR CULTURAL APPROPRIATION. OTHERWISE FUCK THE FUCK OFF. 
IF I WANT A CUTE ASS STEREOTYPICAL TATTOO IM GONNA GET ONE AND I WILL NOT NEED YOUR DOUCHY APPROVAL, YOU HUMAN BUTT-PLUG.

god bless u for acknowledging cultural appropriation

why is nobody commenting on the fact that one of the tattoo placement options is ‘muffin top’ like woah man thats really mean what the fuck

2spookysuperwanktural:

kidswithhats:

tsar-bucks:

OKAY MOTHER FUCKERS CAN WE TALK ABOUT THIS PLEASE OKAY GOOD. Y’ALL DOUCHE CANOES BETTER STEP THE  FUCK OFF OF GIRLS. MAYBE A GIRL WANTS A CUTE LITTLE FEATHER OF A FLOCK OF BIRDS OR AN ANCHOR ON HER BODY. MAYBE SHE DOESN’T. MAYBE HER GENDER DOESN’T DEFINE OR CONTROL ANY OF THAT. WHO ARE YOU TO MOTHER FUCKING JUDGE HER FOR WHATEVER SHE GETS. IT’S HER FUCKING BODY. ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE A TATTOO ARTIST LIKE HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT TATTOOS AND THE BODILY AUTONOMY AND SELF EXPRESSION WHICH GOES WITH THEM BUT THEN MAKE EXCEPTIONS FOR WOMEN. FUCK. THAT. FUCK. YOU.

IF YOU’RE GONNA CRITICIZE ANY OF THESE TATTOO CHOICES, CRITICIZE THE DREAM CATCHER FOR CULTURAL APPROPRIATION. OTHERWISE FUCK THE FUCK OFF. 

IF I WANT A CUTE ASS STEREOTYPICAL TATTOO IM GONNA GET ONE AND I WILL NOT NEED YOUR DOUCHY APPROVAL, YOU HUMAN BUTT-PLUG.

god bless u for acknowledging cultural appropriation

why is nobody commenting on the fact that one of the tattoo placement options is ‘muffin top’ like woah man thats really mean what the fuck

solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info
solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus
Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)
Zoom Info

solo-vintage:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus

Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)

unfollower:

i dont get why people say ‘tea is just leaf water’ and then act like coffee’s so great like what do u think you’re drinking. bean water is what